Friday, March 5, 2010

Banjo versus TV week 103: I make an ape face when I play the banjo

A check-in on the Banjo versus TV project — J.R.'s ongoing plan to spend more time on his banjo than on TV. This post covers 2/14/2010 through 2/20/2010.
Banjo 615 hrs, TV 605 hours

I am not an unattractive man.

See?  See?

A little hirsute, perhaps. But normally I look like a human being.

So why is it that, in all of the pictures of me playing my banjo at the party this week — Oh, and happy birthday Dave, Julie and Cathy — why is it that in all of those pictures, I have ape face?

Do you see the ape face? Here, let me zoom in for you.

Ape face!

See? Ape face.

Here's another one.

Ape face!

And another.

Ape face!

It's kind of a slack-jawed, thinking-real-hard kind of expression.

And if you think the ape face is clear in those photos, you should see the video. Ape face, ape face, ape face.

Several questions spring to mind.

  • Why do I make a face like an ape when I play the banjo?
  • How can I stop making a face like an ape when I play the banjo?
  • I was having a great time. How come I'm not smiling?
  • Do I only make the ape face when I play the banjo or do I also make it when I play other instruments?

Actually, I can answer that last one. Here's me playing my washtub bass at that same party.

Say it low: ape face!

So, yeah. There it is. Ape face.


Also in the last week:

  • TV-wise, my obsession with Phineas and Ferb continues. You should really check out the pitch reel on the Phineas and Ferb: The Fast and the Phineas DVD. It's the cartoonists' crudely animated sketchbook that they put together for Disney executives. An interesting view into the creative and corporate process.
  • Also, TV-wise, is this:

Cross-posted at J.R.'s Banjo Hangout blog

3 comments:

Andrew said...

No comments on the ape-face....

But oh man that muppets video! Thanks for the Saturday morning laugh!

jenksie said...

let me add, hairy. hairy ape face. : )

Jason McInnes said...

I have also noticed your what I call your "very intent" face. It's great!
The practice of not smiling is very common. It doesn't have to be changed, but can be. I've found it quite freeing in some ways. Like so many things in my life and my music, it starts with a deep breath.
Great post!
Jason